The Monday Digest: First Things First

Happy 4th of July week! If you haven’t noticed, your email inbox and television screens have been bombarded with sales and incentives around this celebratory holiday. You may have gotten flip flops for a dollar or nabbed a summer dress for 50% off. It may not seem like it matters but there’s a likeliness that you also bought something in that store 100% full price. If not, don’t worry, you’ll return soon. The point is, tactics like these get potential clients in the door and reward existing clients for all of their loyalty and dollars. To build your clientele or increase your customers, give them a reward for coming in your door and be sure to well publicize it.

Enjoy the links and Happy Monday!

PRCoutureFashion Bloggers, Brands and Sponsored Campaigns vs. PR Outreach

PR Daily: Why A Reporter Didn’t Open A PR Pro’s Three Email Pitch Letters

Wired PR Works: How to Gauge Twitter Reactions and Results

Denver PR Blog: Engaging Your Customers

Strategic PR: Context + Relevance - An Important Equation

PR Newser: 3 Tips to Up Your Personal Brand

Tech Effect: Five Reasons Why I’m Not Using Facebook Advertising

PR Sydney: The Difference Between Advertising and PR

Got more questions about this? Email us! Blog@ThePRWorkShop.com

www.ThePRWorkShop.com

PR  
Press  

1 year ago

Set Your Mark: Targeting Your PR Efforts

A large part of public relations is communicating, an even more important part is communicating your well-thought out message with the right audience. 

There are startups who buy our products and are often unsure about the next step in the process, they wonder “How can I do this pr thing on my own?”. That’s why we have this blog of course. To guide. After you’ve got the message you are trying to convey prepared and in hand, the next step is targeting the ears and eyes you’d like to receive it. 

These efforts are best kept both simple and efficient. Meaning its a waste of time to throw darts everywhere. Here are the three groups to keep at top of mine. 

Direct Consumer: This includes your existing customers, the people you spend your days trying to attract as customers and any person who resembles the target consumer you should have identified at the outset. All of these will have a tendency to frequent the same locations on the internet as well as outside of it. Connect with them, speak to them, engage them. Once you have their interest, you have a sale. 

Press: This includes magazines, newspapers, blogs, webzines, trade publications and in come cases social media. Be careful, never carelessly contact a journalist simply because their employer is “XYZ Magazine”, after all, they could be a music writer when you need the business section. Read articles, use google, Linkedin and social media to spotlight exactly who you should speak with, then use the same method to speak with them. 

Influencers: This group includes celebrities, people of influence in your particular industry and early adopters. These are people who’s opinions influence the opinions of others. They can sway an undecided consumer to buy and introduce products via something as simple as a tweet. This group is powerful and usually are followed by a group or tribe of your target consumer. 

This is how pr pros target, now its your turn, best of luck. 

PR  
Target  

2 years ago

Three of The Biggest Brand Mistakes For New (and old) Companies

Embarking on a startup should come with a warning label that reads “Caution: Mistakes Ahead”. They happen, and in many cases to the benefit of the courageous souls who embark on starting a business from scratch in the first place.

There are however mistakes that are bigger than others and can become difficult to rebound from. Often they exist in early stage branding and public relations efforts. Here are three big ones to AVOID:

Mistake #1
Signing on to Everything
    Every business person knows that every deal isn’t a good deal and every experienced publicist knows that every placement isn’t a good placement. Be careful, as you are new, there are a great deal of other new businesses out there that will look to align with your business. While its nice to want to immediately take every chance for promotion you can get, answer these questions first: Do there business goals align with mine? Do they attract my target demographic? What is the likeliness that this opportunity will really give me positive press or positioning? Do they have any negative press or images attached to their name? Will aligning with this company devalue mine?
Questions like these can be difficult to answer when its a close contact or acquaintance looking to join forces but its better to be safe in the short term than sorry in the long.

Mistake #2
Not Being Consistent
    We talked about this in an earlier blogpost but consistency is important across all platforms of your outreach and communication. This one is more easily resolved than mistake number one and has much more to do with connecting to your consumer than bad press. In the beginning, its important to make a lasting impression. There are thousands of businesses erected every day (literally). Its important that every moment a potential customer sees yours, they remember it and understand what you stand for. In the beginning, keep all correspondence and social media output in line with your core values and mission. Don’t worry, you’ll have leeway later when the big bucks start rolling in.

Mistake #3
Not Caring About PR
    This mistake happens all the time, entrepreneurs get so caught up in sales they forget about their brand. Here’s a thought, great branding and press make sales!! While it may not be as direct as cold calling, great press can be worth a great deal of money in product sales. Don’t let it fall by the wayside. Perhaps delegate 5-10 hours a week strictly to public relations, social media and branding. Make the most of those hours and keep track of the results.

As we’ve said, mistakes are inevitable but if you see a road block, simple changes can help you avoid. Need help with this? Scout an intern or a partner in your company who can take on the task of ensuring everything goes smoothly. In the end when reporters are calling you up for interviews and comments, you’ll be glad you did.

Got more questions about this? Email us! Blog@ThePRWorkShop.com

www.ThePRWorkShop.com

PR  
Press  

2 years ago
Start Up PR 101
Getting  started is always the toughest part, but great part is that its absolutely half the battle. Everything seems like a challenge  and the finish line seems so far away. But often, its the hardest part  because many new business owners simply don’t know how. They know where  they’re going but they’re not quite sure which airport to book a flight  out of so to speak.
There are simple steps to make it easy.
1. Know Your Brand
When  you’re a founding partner, or the founding everything for some, this  can be simple, but the goal is to REALLY know your brand. This is  something that has to be defined in one sentence or less. Its that  simple.
2. Know Your Target
It doesn’t matter how prepared  you are, how great your product is or how many pitches you send if the  right consumers don’t know it exists and aren’t moved to buy it. There  is nothing worse than a message that falls on deaf ears. Err on the side  of caution when trying to market to “everyone”, it doesn’t work and  today, there is no “everyone”. Instead there are small groups or tribes  of likeminded people who have a tendency to follow and buy the same  thing. Find the tribe that’s willing to buy yours, learn everything you  can about them, including what they read and move on to poing number 3.
3. Target What Your Target Reads
Today,  people consume media like they consume food, they often just don’t  realize it. Instead of reading newspapers and magazines, they’re reading  blogs, ipad dailies, social media updates, email newsletters and  everything in between. Its important for you to know what these things  are and who gets something published in them.
4. Make A Contact LIst
While  public relations differs from selling, its quite similar, there is a  great deal of contacting people to tell them all about your product and  why they, and your target group should care. Make a list of people to  give a call to (how to pitch to them is in the next post), tell them  about your brand, get them interested, and of course send them samples  of your product. Building relationships are key, even if a journalist,  blogger or influencer passes on your product the first time, they may  come back for your later. Keep the door wide open.
5. Keep Materials On Hand
Journalists  have a huge load that sometime business owners and even professional  public relations officers just don’t understand. They’re working long  hours, receiving a million calls a day, often covering two verticals (ie  money, health, business, etc.) and they’re always on a deadline. If you  want them to write about your product, its your job to take initiative  and make their lives easy. Always keep a recent press release, a bio and  a media kit with your latest work, lookbook, company mission, latest  press, etc. on hand. They don’t want or have time to email you back and  forth asking for this information, its important that if they ask once,  you can happily and quickly provide it. We can help you with that here.
All  of these are equally important, and not complete without confidence and  absolute belief in yourself and your product.

Got more questions about this? Email us! Blog@ThePRWorkShop.com
www.ThePRWorkShop.com

Start Up PR 101

Getting started is always the toughest part, but great part is that its absolutely half the battle. Everything seems like a challenge and the finish line seems so far away. But often, its the hardest part because many new business owners simply don’t know how. They know where they’re going but they’re not quite sure which airport to book a flight out of so to speak.

There are simple steps to make it easy.

1. Know Your Brand

When you’re a founding partner, or the founding everything for some, this can be simple, but the goal is to REALLY know your brand. This is something that has to be defined in one sentence or less. Its that simple.

2. Know Your Target

It doesn’t matter how prepared you are, how great your product is or how many pitches you send if the right consumers don’t know it exists and aren’t moved to buy it. There is nothing worse than a message that falls on deaf ears. Err on the side of caution when trying to market to “everyone”, it doesn’t work and today, there is no “everyone”. Instead there are small groups or tribes of likeminded people who have a tendency to follow and buy the same thing. Find the tribe that’s willing to buy yours, learn everything you can about them, including what they read and move on to poing number 3.

3. Target What Your Target Reads

Today, people consume media like they consume food, they often just don’t realize it. Instead of reading newspapers and magazines, they’re reading blogs, ipad dailies, social media updates, email newsletters and everything in between. Its important for you to know what these things are and who gets something published in them.

4. Make A Contact LIst

While public relations differs from selling, its quite similar, there is a great deal of contacting people to tell them all about your product and why they, and your target group should care. Make a list of people to give a call to (how to pitch to them is in the next post), tell them about your brand, get them interested, and of course send them samples of your product. Building relationships are key, even if a journalist, blogger or influencer passes on your product the first time, they may come back for your later. Keep the door wide open.

5. Keep Materials On Hand

Journalists have a huge load that sometime business owners and even professional public relations officers just don’t understand. They’re working long hours, receiving a million calls a day, often covering two verticals (ie money, health, business, etc.) and they’re always on a deadline. If you want them to write about your product, its your job to take initiative and make their lives easy. Always keep a recent press release, a bio and a media kit with your latest work, lookbook, company mission, latest press, etc. on hand. They don’t want or have time to email you back and forth asking for this information, its important that if they ask once, you can happily and quickly provide it. We can help you with that here.

All of these are equally important, and not complete without confidence and absolute belief in yourself and your product.

Got more questions about this? Email us! Blog@ThePRWorkShop.com

www.ThePRWorkShop.com

pr  
pr 101  

2 years ago